Glossary

Learn More. Understand More. Smile More!

Analytics may seem like some sort of secret language. The truth is, once you know a few key terms, you’ll be getting more out of your Smylelytics email in no time!

Bounce Rate

Bounce Rate

Percentage of people who enter your site but leave without visiting any other page. The benchmark for a healthy bounce rate can vary by website purpose and the website’s construction. Note that homepages typically have a bounce rate that is considerably higher (50–70%) than internal pages because sometimes your site attracts the wrong people, and your homepage may see the most visitors. Plus, some people may come to your homepage just for information like your phone number or address. A website with fewer internal pages may see a higher overall bounce rate than a website with more pages. The bounce rate on your Smylelytics email is the average bounce rate for all of your visits no matter what page a visitor landed on.
Goal Conversion Rate

Goal Conversion Rate

This is the part that makes website owners smile—when a visitor does what you want them to do! A conversion is typically a desired action taken by a website visitor, such as filling out a form or making a purchase. The Conversion Rate therefor is the percentage of visitors that took the desired action. What your conversion is specifically may vary, but it should be the action you want the visitor to take, the one that is the most direct route to revenue for your company. Increasing your Goal Conversion Rate is the most direct route to getting more productivity out of your website.
Visits

Visits

The total number of visits or sessions for your website during the time period. Remember, this includes people who come back more than once. If you were a retail store, this would be the equivalent of the total number of people that came through the door.
Pages Per Session

Pages Per Session

This is the average number of pages visitors viewed during a session on your website. The higher the number, the more engaged visitors are. A higher number means visitors are successful at finding what they want and feel connected enough to look around. A low number could mean your site takes too long to load, you attracted the wrong type of visitor, your navigation didn’t help the visitor find what they wanted, or they weren’t attracted by the design or experience.
Time On Site

Time On Site

This is the average amount of time someone had a browser open with your website in one of the active tabs. Don’t confuse this with the amount of time someone was engaged and looking at your site. A visitor could have another tab opened to look at another website while yours was open. The amount of time itself isn’t as important as how much it goes up or down based on changes you make or new sources of advertising you use.
New Visits

New Visits

Google Analytics puts a cookie on a visitor’s device when they visit your website to track them across multiple visits. New Visits are visitors who don’t have that cookie, so we infer that they are visiting your website for the first time. Depending on your website, people may purposefully come back repeatedly to read new material or see new resources you make available—so low New Visits may be OK. Some businesses are always seeking new leads and new customers so they carefully monitor New Visits.

These important metrics can become even more valuable by refining them to include just one segment of your visitors. For example, if you only market your product or services in the state of Maine, you’ll get more valuable insights by limiting your measurement to just visitors from Maine. Maybe you rely on a lot of traffic from search engines. You may benefit by restricting these metrics to just measuring traffic from search engines.